Noun Acclamation Definition and Examples


Noun:

Acclamation

Pronunciation:

/ˌakləˈmeɪʃ(ə)n/

Definition:
1.

noun

Loud and enthusiastic approval.
  1. 'The acclamation had been nearly unanimous: shouts of the imperial troops at Rome, seconded wholeheartedly by the Senate, the rabble, the clergy.'
  2. 'But I've done 140 gigs this year and here I am, able to tootle around the world to incredible acclamation, and I think that's amazing, and I love it, after 27 years of it!'
  3. 'This was received with acclamation, and the proclamation was made from the Hotel de Ville.'
  4. 'No proclamation or ceremony was needed, no public acclamation or even acceptance; behind their backs, the people had got a new sovereign.'
  5. 'However, the greatest acclamation was reserved for the audience who to a person applauded and cheered at the conclusion of the play.'
  6. 'He gave unlucky Derby second Silver Patriarch a typically-robust ride to take the St Leger of 1997, and the crowd's roar of acclamation that day showed just how much they wanted Eddery to crown his career in fairytale style.'
  7. 'During the introductions I mentioned that information science is integral to each of the sciences represented and received loud acclamation.'
  8. 'Tang's excellent depictions of the 160 odd characters in the ‘Peony Pavilion’ has earned him centuries of acclamation from generations of dramatists.'
  9. 'Three-one at half-time and the crowd rose in acclamation.'
  10. 'Parliament and public greeted this imperial retreat with a fanfare of acclamation.'
((n.) A shout of approbation, favor, or assent; eager expression of approval; loud applause.|--|(n.) A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.|--|)


noun

1. a loud shout or other demonstration of welcome, goodwill, or approval.

2. act of acclaiming.

3. Liturgy. a brief responsive chant in antiphonal singing.

4. Ecclesiastical. response (def 3a). Idioms

5. by acclamation, by an oral vote, often unanimous, expressing approval by shouts, hand-clapping, etc., rather than by formal ballot.


Examples:

"acclamations can be on dates."
"people can have acclamations."
"trades can have acclamations."
"supporters can have acclamations."
"subjects can have acclamations."
"princes can have acclamations."
"policies can have acclamations."
"places can have acclamations."
"entries can have acclamations."
"acclamations can be from populaces."
"acclamations can be for plans."
"acclamations can be at sessions."
"acclamations can be at meetings."
"acclamations can be as giants."
"acclamations can be after speeches."

Origin:
Mid 16th century: from Latin acclamatio(n-), from acclamare ‘shout at’, later ‘shout in approval’ (see acclaim).

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