Noun Acadian Definition and Examples


Noun:

Acadian

Pronunciation:

/əˈkeɪdɪən/

Definition:
1.

adjective

Relating to Acadia or its people.
  1. 'She herself has strong French-Canadian connections - as well as Acadian and Native (Haché) heritage.'
  2. 'Kadlec's twin compositions focus overwhelmingly on the mid-eighteenth-century Acadian landscape itself, executed in a style reminiscent of a Dutch master.'
  3. 'Faragher writes that by the beginning of the 18th century Acadian ties with France had become tenuous at best and that the Acadians had come to think of themselves as a separate people.'
  4. 'Despite British attempts to impose its language and culture, Acadian culture persisted.'
  5. 'Louisiana became English-speaking, and Acadian culture was reduced to a distinctive and now fashionable cuisine known as ‘Cajun cooking’.'
  6. 'Two World Acadian Congresses in the 1990s helped very much to foster Acadian pride.'
  7. 'A group of citizens concerned about the erosion of Acadian culture in the Cheticamp area formed a non-profit co-op in 1992 to raise funds for a community-based radio station.'
  8. 'The 23 participants enjoyed traditional Acadian cuisine and entertainment.'
  9. 'Or discover the meaning of our famous Acadian joie de vivre (joy of life) as you sing along to the dinner theater at the Village Historique Acadien!'
  10. 'The continued life of Acadian culture, now largely based in New Brunswick but reaching as far as its diaspora travels, is a testament to the show's message.'

noun

A native or inhabitant of Acadia.
  1. 'These early Acadians boasted names now commonplace in Nova Scotia, such as Blanchard, Comeau, LeBlanc, Belliveau, and Pettipas.'
  2. 'When the Expulsion came in 1755, the Acadians around Tatamagouche were the first to be deported, and the village was destroyed.'
  3. 'The Spanish government granted the Acadians the uninhabited land around the Atchafalaya where, in time, they learnt to harvest the natural bounty of the swamps and marshes growing rice and raising cattle on the prairies.'
  4. 'Faragher argues that the evidence is overwhelming that the Acadians posed no threat to British rule and that their expulsion was motivated more by greed and religious prejudice than any security threat.'
  5. 'There is an Acadian tradition that Phillips gave the Acadians an oral promise that they would never be conscripted to fight against the French, and probably he did give them some assurances, though he reported no such promise to London.'
  6. 'France retained only its fishing rights on the northern coast of Newfoundland and the islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon, where inhabitants from Louisbourg and Acadians resettled.'
  7. 'Thanks to the bond of brotherhood and self-sacrifice, many Acadians survived the atrocities inflicted by Governor Lawrence of Nova Scotia in 1755.'
  8. 'Many Acadians fled thither after the dispersion of Grand Pré and the fall of Louisbourg.'
  9. 'When the Acadians asked for ships to transport them there, the British commander on the ground pointed out that a year had already passed, and the question of their departure had to be referred to Queen Anne.'
  10. 'Over the course of the festival, 250,000 people descended from those early Acadians are expected to participate in 1,200 events around Nova Scotia.'
  11. 'The historian George Bancroft, who wrote an essay on the Acadians himself, was starting his ten-volume History of the United States.'
  12. 'Both works covered much ground lost in the rather shrill media reportage o n the subject, particularly the long, peaceful and very productive relationship between the Acadians and the Mi'kmaq that reaches back to 1604.'
  13. 'This seemed logical because of Britain's traditional suspicion of the French in North America: in 1755 French-speaking Acadians had been expelled from the new British colony of Nova Scotia.'
  14. 'Cheticamp is made up almost entirely of Acadians, though about 25 percent of the population along this whole stretch of coast are anglophone.'
  15. 'The cultural background of those fishing in the area south of Antigonish Harbor, while mixed, is dominated by Acadians.'
  16. 'Nova Scotia is rich in cultural heritage from many communities - Blacks, Natives, Acadians, and Europeans.'
  17. 'The rights of minority francophones and Acadians do not exist because of Qubec.'
  18. 'Interestingly, this definition of ‘Canadian’ excluded those from the provinces of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, as well as French Canadians and Acadians.'
  19. 'The French-speaking Acadians, however, held onto their own culture.'
  20. 'There are also French Canadians - known as Acadians - in the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island.'
  21. 'This year, Acadians from around the world will gather in Nova Scotia for the Congres mondial acadien 2004.'
  22. 'Many of us in this country - Québecois, Natives, Métis, Inuits, Acadians - are citizens by conquest and not by choice.'
  23. 'North and east of this line, all is rouge, with the Acadians voting ‘almost en bloc for one political party, the Liberals’.'
  24. 'Louisiana attracted Acadians who wanted to rejoin their kin and Acadian culture.'
  25. 'In Louisiana the Creoles and Acadians rejected the cotton planters' Southern nationalism.'
((n.) A native of Acadie.)



Similar Nouns to Acadian

List of Nouns that Start with A-Z


List of Nouns that End with A-Z


List of Nouns by Length

3 letters4 letters5 letters6 letters7 letters8 letters9 letters10 letters11 letters12 letters